ELI LILLY’S RAYVOW (LASMIDITAN) FOR THE TREATMENT OF MIGRAINES APPROVED IN THE US

The FDA has approved Eli Lilly and Company Reyvow (lasmiditan) pill for the treatment of acute (active, but short-lived) migraine with or without aura in adult patients. It should be noted that the drug is not intended for the prophylactic treatment of migraine.

ELI LILLY'S RAYVOW (LASMIDITAN) FOR THE TREATMENT OF MIGRAINES APPROVED IN THE US

The efficacy of lasmiditan was evaluated in two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in 3177 adult patients with a history of migraine with or without aura. According to the results obtained, the number of patients who, two hours after taking Reyvow, disappeared migraine symptoms, including nausea, sensitivity to sound and light, was significantly higher than when taking placebo.

The most common side effects associated with taking lasmiditan were dizziness, fatigue, paresthesia, and sedation. It should be noted that the use of lasmiditan affects the ability to drive a vehicle, therefore it is not recommended to drive a car for at least eight hours after taking the drug.

Source: fda.gov

 

4 thoughts on “ELI LILLY’S RAYVOW (LASMIDITAN) FOR THE TREATMENT OF MIGRAINES APPROVED IN THE US”

  1. Welp, those side effects pretty much rule it out for me, and I’m guessing most others with chronic migraines will probably feel the same way. This might be great for people who get migraines a few times a year, but as someone who gets them regularly…. Nope.

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  2. Summary: Took it and it made me drowsy. Seemed to cut off the first signs of a migraine/cluster headache, but it was kind of like taking extra strength benadryl for allergies. Sure it works, but it’ll knock you out. Not sure if it’s any better than Maxalt.

    My PCP had a sample of Reyvow, and I recently took it for migraines/cluster headaches. On the front end, I think I’m on the upward swing (hopefully) of things, so take it for what it’s worth.

    I took a 100 mg of Reyvow in the afternoon (around 1:00ish) after taking Maxalt and Aleve in the morning (around 5:30) and propanolol/magnesium glycinate as a preventative. At the time I wasn’t in pain, but I could feel the first symptoms coming on and wanted to get ahead of it and figured I’d try Reyvow.

    The first symptoms dissipated within an hour, but I was in bed shortly afterward dozing off and on. It did seem successful at cutting off the initial symptoms, but I think I could have just as well taken Maxalt with similar efficacy and without the drowsiness. The next morning, though, I didn’t feel any first signs of a migraine at the time I normally would, but that may be because things have been getting better the last couple of days.

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  3. From reading the article, it is hard to say whether it could become the next pain medication for abuse. I think it could go either way because some people have the tendency to abuse medication, while others do not, when taking the same medication.

    My opinion on this med, is that it has side effects that I wouldn’t like to have (such as the paresthesia, which is basically a pins and needles, and/or a prickly feeling and/or a numbing sensation on your skin … and that it affects your central nervous system with adverse effects), and the Reyvow hasn’t been studied much yet.

    Because it hasn’t been studied much, and because it hasn’t even been classified by the DEA as to what kind of controlled substance it would be yet, I would not be willing to take it until more studies have been done.

    I’m not sure if this is just me thinking this, but it seems like the manufacturer is in a big rush to get the Reyvow out to the public. Here they wrote an article (on October 11, 2019) without even knowing all of the information about it … they won’t even know what the controlled substance classification is for 90 days, and they are already telling people about it.

    So to answer your question, it is hard to say whether it could become the next pain medication for abuse. I think it could go either way because some people have the tendency to abuse medication, while others do not, when taking the same medication.

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